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New Year = New Bold Color

Kabuki, 3.5″x2.5″ mixed media

2019 began for me with an Award of Merit for my “Kabuki” painting in the Copley Society of Art small works show. This miniature painting was created by transferring the image of one of my 24″x18″ watercolor paintings fused into encaustic medium, then highlighted with pigmented wax and oil pastels. The translucent layers of wax allow for light to travel and keep the colors brilliant. You can visit the entire show online here – Copley Society of Art

I also have been focused on alcohol inks and discovering multiple ways this paint can be combined (safely) with encaustic medium, as well as painted directly on Yupo and other papers. The movement and layered color has been very liberating as I have taken my private studio practice in the direction of abstraction.

Nest 1, 12″x12″ alcohol ink and encaustic on panel
Nest 2, 12″x12″ alcohol ink and encaustic on panel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These paintings are successful when combined together as a diptych or as individual works. I’ve also started painting on larger sheets of Yupo paper, and will be playing/learning with different types of inks from various companies going forward.

So far, I have used Piñata and Ranger combined with extenders and 91% alcohol. I’ve been reading “Pigments of Your Imagination” by Cathy Taylor which made clear a connection for my love of watercolor wash techniques to a similar love for alcohol ink painting.

Living a creative life has always been my happy place. It feels good to be learning something new and unfamiliar… being vulnerable to trial and error opens the door to alternative thinking and creativity… after all, what else is there?

Polar Blast, 26″x20″ alcohol ink on Yupo
Underwater Cave, 20’x26″ alcohol ink on Yupo
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New-Old Direction & Holiday Shows

This past weekend, I taught an encaustic “sampler” workshop at the Evanston Art Center. We used various mixed media materials that combine effortlessly with wax. In the demo painting below, mulberry paper creates a translucent linear wave pattern, I then added white shellac and oil pastel to highlight the setting sun over the ocean waves. There is something very beautiful in simplicity and I hope to continue exploring the “less is more” concept.

One of my older watercolors below, and most likely the subconscious inspiration for the above encaustic painting.

Another new direction: Pea Pods

I built an armature base, coated the wire with plaster, then shaped the plaster and added encaustic medium to the assemblage.

Wax is poured into the cradled panel in order to secure various parts. Building armature for encaustic is a new addition to the weekly techniques we cover in classes. I resume teaching after the new year at both the Evanston Art Center and the North Shore Art League.

Class info available here:

Evanston Art Center

North Shore Art League

Holiday Shows:

Next week, show opening and artist reception will be featuring students who attend my classes at the North Shore Art League.

Currently, I am also exhibiting at the Evanston Art Center in their annual holiday art expo. Below is a photograph of some of my miniature paintings being featured all month.

 

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Geisha

New Geisha paintings

Geisha Okichi san
mixed media on board
3.5” x 2.5”
Moonbeams
mixed media on board
3.5” x 2.5”
Geisha in Red
mixed media on board
3.5” x 2.5”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Definition from Wikipedia:
Japanese name
Kanji 芸者
“Geisha (芸者) or geigi (芸妓) are traditional female Japanese entertainers. They are skilled at different Japanese arts, like playing classical Japanese music, dancing and poetry. Some people believe that geisha are prostitutes, this however is false. The term “geisha” is made of two Japanese words, 芸 (gei) meaning “art” and 者 (sha) meaning “person who does” or “to be employed in”. The most literal translation of geisha to English is “artist”. Geisha are very respected and it is hard to become one.”

There are many more in depth definitions of the geisha but my inspiration is based on their extensive training and specialized skills pertaining to various art forms.

Years ago I did a series of paintings in watercolor and I decided to revisit the same subject using a miniature format with encaustic and oil pastel. I love the translucent depth created with wax medium.

Geisha in this series is my way of portraying simplicity, serenity, the vibrant color of life, with a strong sense of female independence and knowledge.

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Summer Inspiration

Garden Vows
mixed media on board
3.5” x 2.5”
Garden Walk
mixed media on board
2.5” x 3.5”
Red Roses
mixed media on board
3.5” x 2.5”

I recently visited the Chicago Botanic Gardens knowing I would find visual inspiration. The colors of gorgeous velvety red roses in the Rose Garden, to the perfectly manicured bonsai and pine trees in the Japanese Garden, were a gift. In the English Walled Garden, I watched as wedding vows were exchanged, the scene felt like a chapter out of a fairy tale. I knew this would become the subject for a new painting.

Seeing the vibrant colors of lotus and lilies, wildflowers and roses, were a wake-up call. My eyes had been resting for too long this summer, and the newest series of miniature paintings (above) remind me of what we often take for granted… the purity of nature’s beauty and gifts.

Next weekend I’ll be exhibiting at the Evanston Art and Big Fork festival. If you are local and interested in seeing great art from 130 exhibitors, live music combined with loads of food and beverages, definitely make the time to visit. I’ll be in booth #133.

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3 down … 2 to go!

I am in the midst of summer art festival season and now have a three week break before my next exhibition in Evanston. I already started work on new miniature paintings, (they were a big hit at my last show on Michigan Avenue). I also plan on painting more Buddhas in order to completely fill one wall in my tent. The Buddhas have become an installation wall and more often than not I sell multiple pieces, allowing patrons to create the same installation effect in their homes.

Buddha Wall

The most stressful part of participating in outdoor festivals, for me, is always the weather… it’s the one thing out of my control! Last weekend, it was humid and rainy for all three days, although I was grateful there was minimal attendance despite the dreary weather. My tent began leaking in several different areas, I’ve already replaced it and thanks to Amazon Prime it was delivered today. Now I need to practice setting it up in order to guarantee I’ll know what to do at the next show.

I’m convinced if I wasn’t passionate about meeting people, summer weather, and encaustic painting, I’d find an easier way to share my work with the world. Professional artists are always talking about the various ways to exhibit, from high end galleries, in local and national art shows, to walls in restaurants and coffee houses, and everything in between, but I choose to be my own gallery at these festivals. Galleries usually earn 50% commission (well worth it if they do a good job bringing in patrons you wouldn’t otherwise have access to), but if you are willing to do the work, it feels good to keep 100% of a sale.

My next exhibition will be Evanston Art and Big Fork festival beginning August 17 through August 19.